Electric Vans Will Soon Overtake Diesel LCVs in Cost-Effectiveness Stakes

Electric Vans Will Soon Overtake Diesel LCVs in Cost-Effectiveness Stakes

Electric Vans Will Soon Overtake Diesel LCVs in Cost-Effectiveness Stakes

In less than five years it will be more affordable for businesses to buy and run delivery vans which are powered by electric motors rather than diesel engines, according to UPS.

The global delivery provider said that although combustion engines are still king when it comes to keeping costs to a minimum at the moment, this state of affairs is set to shift in the first half of the next decade, the Telegraph reports.

Its claims specifically relate to vans weighing more than seven tonnes. And it has already put a small number of electric vehicles which fit this description into service in London, with plans to add more zero-emissions delivery vans in the near future.

UPS executive Peter Harris believes that this will not only help to cut the environmental impact of its operations in the UK and elsewhere but also allow it to boost profits as a result.

Harris said that the falling cost of running an electric LCV was clearly the key to making them more attractive as a prospect for businesses of all sizes. And although he would not set a specific date for this change to occur, he did point to the early 2020s as being a landmark era for the viability of EVs as a whole.

The plan is to convert the entire London-based fleet of UPS vans to all-electric power trains, meaning that a total of 170 vehicles will store energy in batteries and operate without producing any harmful emissions. With higher charges for polluting vehicles coming into effect in the capital, this will have other cost benefits for the firm.

Running an electric car which only has to carry human passengers around is seen as being more affordable where fuel costs are concerned. But the greater power requirements and weights of LCVs mean that it is more difficult to justify adoption at the moment, especially for larger-scale vehicles of the kind used by UPS.

What has prompted Harris to make these positive predictions about the way the market will develop is the news that improved battery charging systems are being created at the moment. The rollout of this enhanced infrastructure across London will mean that when high-capacity vans are being recharged, they do not disrupt the availability of power in the surrounding area.

In the long run the aim is to prove the effectiveness of the new charging stations and bring them to other cities throughout the UK, which will benefit businesses and normal motorists alike.

By 2040 the government intends to eliminate all new fossil fuel vehicles from the market, meaning that the eventual switch to electric power trains is inevitable. A mixture of infrastructural improvements and tax incentives will be used in the interim to boost the sales of zero-emission vans and HGVs.

Large organisations like UPS are certainly in a good position to take the plunge and adopt EVs in large volumes. But compact electric vans like the Kangoo Z.E. from Renault mean that even small businesses and sole traders can follow suit.

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