Impact of LCV Boom Assessed in Government Report

Figures published by the Department of Transport show that 2016 was a record year in terms of the number of miles driven by vans on roads across Britain.

Figures published by the Department of Transport show that 2016 was a record year in terms of the number of miles driven by vans on roads across Britain.

Figures published by the Department of Transport show that 2016 was a record year in terms of the number of miles driven by vans on roads across Britain, according to the Telegraph.

In total, a cumulative 48.5 billion miles were covered by LCVs nationwide, representing the ongoing rise of van sales and use as catalysed by various trends in business and consumer habits and spending.

Experts predict that van use will increase this year, perhaps surpassing 50 billion miles travelled. And while this is a potentially problematic factor as a result of the congestion caused, the benefits can be seen to outweigh the obstacles that have yet to be removed.

Furthermore, the growing popularity of vans is seen as an indicator that businesses are increasingly using LCVs rather than HGVs to achieve their transport goals. Lighter commercial vehicles are the defining factor of the early 21st century, as evidenced when these figures are compared with those compiled in earlier studies.

Figures Rising

Ten years ago the number of miles travelled by vans in the UK was 21.4% lower than in 2016. Meanwhile, in 1996 this level of use was 69% lower than in the modern van-oriented age

Over the course of two decades, the entire commercial vehicle market has changed significantly. And the average amount of use which each van received was also on the rise.

Analysts estimate that a typical LCV was driven for 12,811 miles in 2016. Meanwhile, average annual mileages for passenger cars were much lower, sitting at 8092.

The record year enjoyed by vans contrasts with the dip in HGV use, with 17.1 billion miles covered by heavy goods vehicles. This is almost a billion fewer than the last time this segment of the market hit a peak, which was back in 2008.

Why has there been an LCV Boom?

There are a variety of reasons for the ascent of vans, chief amongst which is that they tend to offer a better value proposition for businesses than trucks because they are cheaper to run and are subjected to less stringent taxes while also offering increased flexibility in terms of their use.

A van can be used to transport goods, deliver produce, handle equipment and get teams of workers from A to B. And this level of adaptability lends itself to improved productivity, whether in urban environments or in rural regions of the country.

Vans have become so prevalent that their sales are outstripping many other vehicle segments. Additionally, an estimated 37% of all LCVs currently in use in the UK were registered within the past half-decade.

New and used vans are more affordable and available to buy than ever, helping to encourage even more organisations to invest in an LCV rather than holding out for an alternative. But with all these miles covered per van, it is still important for buyers of second-hand models to check their options carefully and make sure the vehicle they choose is up to the standards they require.

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